Research Digests

  • Low activity levels affect child mental development

    High activity levels (AL) in early childhood are associated with sub-optimal social and behavioural outcomes, but whether low AL have negative outcomes is unclear. Now, a study conducted by researchers at Boston University has demonstrated that AL are curvilinearly related to mental development.

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  • Do clinicians and service users share responsibility when making decisions?

    The essential elements of shared decision making and what this can look like for CAMHS.

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  • Affirmative care may elicit the best mental health outcomes in transgender youths

    In their recent review published in the Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Jack Turban and Diane Ehrensaft highlight that high rates of anxiety, depression and suicidal intentions in children with gender concerns may be reduced by following affirmative treatment protocols.

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  • Self image estimations impact on mental health

    Our overall estimation of “self image” is thought to be based on various parameters, such as perceptions of body image, mental function and social attitude. Now, a study by Maria Di Blasi and colleagues has investigated the extent by which these different parameters can influence psychological well-being.

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  • Elevated anxiety risk in sexual minority adolescents

    Adolescents that are not exclusively heterosexual (“sexual minority”) are at an increased risk of developing an anxiety disorder compared to their heterosexual counterparts, according to recent data from a prospective birth cohort study.

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  • Rumination affects mother–infant interactions

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  • Processing speed determines dyslexia risk

    Males exhibit a lower average reading performance than females, according to new data from Anne Arnett and colleagues. The researchers devised a framework to first validate the apparent sex difference in prevalence of dyslexia and then determine which cognitive correlates may underlie this difference.

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  • Shared decision making in CAMHS

    With Parents in Mind: Can shared decision making support parents at CAMHS?

    Exploring shared decision making as a triad relationship between clinicians, children and parents where clinicians and service users (i.e. children and parents) share the information when faced with the task of making decisions, and where service users are supported to consider options to achieve informed preferences, may be of value.

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  • The early ASD screening debate continues

    The debate about screening and providing early treatment for young children with, or with high likelihood of, autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is ongoing, but limited data are available to support either side of the argument. Now, a systematic review of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of interventions for children ≤6 years with (or with high likelihood of) ASD has concluded that the available data is currently insufficient to support the argument for early intervention.

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  • Schools need more specialist support

    Schools have a central role in supporting young people with mental health problems, but the level of and type of support available to affected students is unclear. A convenience sample survey of 577 school staff from 341 schools in England has shed light on this issue.

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