Childhood Adversity: Recovery, Resilience and Prevention Seminars

5


Event type 4 half day training online

Online
Thursdays 5, 12, 19, and 26 May 2022
Each delegates receive a full set of the 9 nine practitioner guides and associated licences from Hope for Children and Families.

Summary

A series of four virtual half-day seminars have been organised by ACAMH in collaboration with Child and Family Training (CFT) to familiarise participants with the trauma informed modular Hope for Children and Families: Building on strengths, overcoming difficulties (HfCF) intervention resources (Bentovim and Gray (Eds), 2016, 2017, 2018) to promote:

  • Recovery and restore wellbeing: Working with children and young people who are displaying significant over-lapping mental health responses to adversity to promote healing, repair, and recovery from disruptions to wellbeing.
  • Resilience: Positively adapt to adversity, preventing mental health problems emerging in children and young people living in highly adverse environments, and provide coping techniques to develop resilience, and manage future adversities.
  • Prevention: Addressing highly adverse environments, promoting positive, protective, emotionally responsive parenting, and family functioning, fostering development, wellbeing and security of children, young people, when affected by adverse experiences.

The seminars have been designed for a multi-disciplinary group of practitioners. Each participant will receive a full set of the HfCF intervention resources (nine practitioner guides and associated licences); the library of trauma-informed modular interventions.  

The seminar programme will encourage participants to consider how a program of workshops and coaching could be developed to fit the specific needs of their services and clinical teams across the field of mental health, social care, education, and offending services.

Pricing and booking

  • Members £175
  • Non-members £195

Prices also include exclusive access to all lectures for up to 28 days. Plus all delegates receive an electronic CPD certificate.

To book simply click on this link or the button at the top of the page and fill in the details. ACAMH Members should sign in first to ensure that they get their discount.

If you are not an ACAMH Member now is a great time to join and make a saving on this event. Take a look at the different levels of membership on offer.

Remember ACAMH is a charity and any surplus made is reinvested back to the benefit of our members and the industry as a whole.

Childhood adversity

Currently there are two trends in the field of childhood adversity. The first is an awareness that multiple forms of exposure to trauma often referred to as polyvictimization or multi-type maltreatment is the rule in populations of abused and neglected children rather than the exception (Finkelhor et al. 2007).

The second is that current types of child maltreatment are being extended to include Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs). These include exposure to intra-familial violence, mental health, substance misuse, deaths, losses, and inter-generational abuse. High levels of adversity are noted in children and young people referred to CAMHS (Thompson et al. 2012); offending services (Baglivio and Epps, 2014); looked after children (Lehman et al.  2020); refugee services (Ward et al. 2020) including bullying, victimisation, cyber-bullying, sexual abuse, community violence, racial prejudice, (Turner et al. 2020); and responses to the pandemic (Ford et al. 2021); and climate change (Lawrance et al. 2021).

The common factor across all forms of adversity is a traumatic response with the risk of a ‘toxic traumatic response’ (Teicher et al. 2016; McCrory et al. 2017) Exposure to trauma results in a spectrum of complex overlapping mental health responses, including post-traumatic stress disorders (PTSD) but with high levels of internalising and externalising responses – anxiety, depression, and disruptive behaviour (Lewis et al 2019; Bevilaqua et al. 2021). Children, young people, and parents and carers present across services, for example children’s social care, CAMHS and youth offending services.

Trauma informed approaches have been developed, but the tools to implement an evidence-based approach are not used widely in everyday practice by practitioners. Most approaches have a single focus, and from a variety of theoretical backgrounds (Marchette and Weisz 2017).

Trauma-informed modular interventions

An innovative strategy to help the field better organise and prevent the extensive sequelae of polyvictimization and childhood adversity involves the development of a modular approach. This identifies common treatment elements and common factors across the field of effective interventions and organizes them, providing a co- ordinated framework for practitioners to use to address the diverse needs of children and families when exposure to trauma or maltreatment are identified.

Chorpita and Daleiden (2009) developed a structured methodology to map, identify and categorise the common treatment features from 615 treatments in 322 randomized trials.  It was possible to distil out the specific practice components of each type of treatment i.e. practice elements from different manuals. The Modular Approach for Children with Anxiety, Depression, Trauma and Conduct problems (MATCH-ADTC: Chorpita and Weisz, 2009) is a multi-disorder intervention system that incorporates treatment procedures (elements) and treatment logic (coordination) based on four successful evidence-based CBT interventions for childhood anxiety, depression, trauma (TF-CBT), and conduct problems, with modifications allowing the system to operate as a single protocol. The approach was more effective in improvements in a wide range of mental health problems, than using the component manuals.

The Hope for Children and Families: Building on strengths, overcoming difficulties (HfCF) intervention resources

Working in collaboration with Chorpita and colleagues at the Department of Psychology, University of California, twenty-two RCTs were identified for the treatment of individual forms of maltreatment (Bentovim and Elliott, 2014). The forty-seven common practice elements that emerged were categorised as focusing on work with children, young people, and parents/caregivers. This led to the creation of a library of modules which can be integrated into a management plan, establishing collaborative goals, with children and families, and can be adapted for use across services and comprise elements targeting:

  • the antecedents of adverse childhood experiences include psychoeducation for parents; exploration of the impact and origins of abuse and exposure to violence; addressing parental mental health difficulties; and learning positive parenting skills.
  • work with children and young people including psychoeducation on the impact of their maltreatment; managing and exposing traumatic thoughts and feelings; relaxation; problem-solving; relationship building; and social skills talent/skill building.

Modules are gathered into a set of nine practitioner guides organised using the Framework for the Assessment of Children in Need and their Families (Department of Health et al, 2000) a triangular eco-systemic model developed to help practitioners construct a broad based, holistic picture of the development and health of children in the context of parenting capacity, their individual health, family and environmental factors.

Each guide contains

  • Practitioner briefings summarising theory, research, and approach
  • Content and materials focusing on children, young people, parents, or families.
  • Relevant steps to achieve an evidence-based goal, and the particular focus
  • Suggested scripts for working with children, parents, and families, to help practitioners understand the aim of the module and practitioners find their own voices and approaches
  • Guidance notes – understanding the background to the particular steps
  • Activities supported by worksheets to help achieve a particular planned outcome
  • Practice – role plays, and coaching approaches reinforce learning
  • Handouts for parents to remind them of particular approaches outlined
  • Worksheets for children and parents to negotiate the various steps.

Engagement and Goal Setting (Bentovim, Gray, Heasman and Pizzey 2017)

 

Modules to help the practitioner engage with children, young people, and their family. Promotes a sense of hopefulness about what can be achieved through working with the practitioners, and setting collaborative goals

Working with children and young people: Addressing emotional and traumatic responses (Weeramanthri, 2016);

Working with children and young people: Addressing disruptive behaviour (Eldridge 2017).

Relevant to children and young people exposed to various forms of adversity, and are suffering from concerning emotional, traumatic, and disruptive responses. Includes modules to promote resilience.

Promoting positive parenting (Roberts, 2016).

Promoting attachment, attuned responsiveness, and positive emotional relationships (Gates and Peters 2017)

Promoting children and young people’s health, development, and wellbeing (Bentovim, 2017a).

These guides relate to all children and families, and to staff caring for children and young people. They provide guidance when working with caregiver failure to promote health and wellbeing, neglectful care, disorganised and insecure attachments, and difficulties in managing children’s challenging and disruptive behaviour

Working with families (Jolliffe, 2016).

The modules aim at improving and strengthening the quality of family life, promoting positive parenting and resilience in children, protect children against adversity, building positive parenting capacity and the resilient functioning of children and young

Modifying abusive and neglectful parenting (Bentovim, 2017a)

Working with child sexual abuse (Eldridge 2016).

These intervention guides are more specifically focused on working with children, parents and families where specific forms of adversity abuse and neglect has been identified

The intervention guides have been translated into several languages including Arabic, Portuguese, Romanian, Russian, Spanish, and Turkish. The resources have been used in different countries transcending differences in language, culture, religion, and legislation.

The seminars

There will be four seminars. Each seminar will be recorded and will be made available to any participant who cannot attend a particular session.

1: Making a holistic assessment, and establishing a profile for intervention

The core intervention guide for this seminar is:

  • Engagement and goal setting.

This seminar will focus on situations when children and young people have presented across children’s services and been identified as having been exposed or likely to be exposed to significant adversity.

Utilising video case material, a seven-stage assessment, analysis and intervention approach will be introduced to make a holistic assessment of risk and protective factors, the profile of harm to the child, and/or the risk of future harm to the child, and prospects for intervention, a profile for intervention.

Steps will be set out to engage children and their family, to promote a sense of hopefulness about what can be achieved through working with the practitioners, and setting collaborative goals

2: Early Intervention when children are exposed to significant adversity

The core intervention guides for this seminar are:

  • Working with children and young people: Addressing emotional and traumatic responses (generic modules); and
  • Modifying abusive and neglectful parenting.

This seminar will be based on the broad agreement that exposure to childhood adversity is a powerful risk factor for psychopathology, e.g., children and young people born to parents who have mental health difficulties, are alcohol or substance abuse users, where there is evidence of domestic violence, or family disruption.

Promoting resilience will be addressed utilising generic modules from the guide Working with children and young people: Addressing emotional and traumatic responses. These modules aim to provide the child with a toolkit of skills to help them manage feelings, thoughts and behaviours associated with the core neurodevelopmental responses to adversity, and to address evidence of emerging psychopathology. They are also useful to the practitioner in building relationships with children and young people and helping engage them.

Work with parents to address sources of stress associated with mental health, substance abuse, conflict and family disruption will be addressed utilising modules from Modifying abusive and neglectful parenting.

3: Interventions to address overlapping mental health responses to adversity – traumatic responses, anxiety, depression, disruptive behaviour, and sexually harmful behaviour

The core intervention guides for this seminar are:

  • Working with children and young people: Addressing emotional and traumatic responses (problem specific modules);
  • Working with children and young people: Addressing disruptive behaviour; and,
  • Working with child sexual abuse.

 This seminar will focus on promoting recovery for children and young people who are displaying overlapping mental health responses as a result of being exposed to significant adversity. Utilising video case material participants will be introduced to planning which modules to use and the steps which result in a positive outcome.

It is helpful for children and young people to be introduced to the set of generic modules (seminar 2) before embarking on problem specific interventions. The key guide will be the problem specific modules of the guide Working with children and young people: Addressing emotional and traumatic responses. Modules from this guide address the profile of symptoms associated with exposure to adversity. There is a potential to re-design an intervention if the presenting problems change e.g., a child or young person whose presenting problem is associated with traumatic symptoms may respond with a concerning mood response.

Modules from associated guides Working with children and young people: Addressing disruptive behaviour and Working with Sexual Abuse will be introduced to address disruptive and sexually harmful behaviour. When these responses are presenting it may be appropriate to address these responses initially, but it is likely generic and problem specific modules will need to be included, as challenging behaviour is often associated with traumatic and mood responses.

4: Prevention: Work with parents and the family to address adversity, promote positive parenting, create a positive family environment of care, promote good quality care and development, and secure attachments and emotional responsiveness

The core intervention guides for this seminar are:

  • Promoting Positive Parenting; and associated guides,
  • Working with Families
  • Promoting children and young people’s health, development and wellbeing;
  • Promoting attachment, attuned responsiveness, and positive emotional relationships and
  • Working with Child Sexual Abuse.

The goal of this seminar is to work with parents and the family to address sources of current adversity and to prevent future adversity, develop positive parenting, promote development, and improve family relationships, emotional responsiveness and secure attachments.

Core goals working to reduce the harmful impact of exposure to childhood adversity are to identify the presence of harmful parenting, to protect children and young people from harm, promote recovery and resilience; and help parents address abusive and neglectful responses.

To achieve a successful outcome, it is essential for parents to be able to provide positive parenting, improve the quality of family relationships, promote the care and development of children and young people, develop secure attachments and emotional responsiveness, and protect children who have been abused sexually and those displaying sexually harmful behaviour.

Although the focus of this seminar is the family and parenting, the modules often include children and young people so that work can be directed at the interactions in the home, and to work to improve responses in the here and now, and to initiate future work using associated guides, working with the family, promoting development and secure attachments.

The presenters

Arnon Bentovim

Dr Arnon Bentovim is a Child and Family Psychiatrist, and Director of Child and Family Training. He trained as a Psychoanalyst and Family Therapist and worked at the Great Ormond Street Children’s Hospital and the Tavistock Clinic. He is a Visiting Professor at the Royal Holloway University of London. At Great Ormond Street he shared responsibility for Child Protection at the Hospital and helped to initiate a number of services including the first Sexual Abuse Assessment and Treatment Service in the UK, and a Child Care Consultation Service. Research on Family Assessment formed the basis of the tools commissioned by the Department of Health to support the Assessment Framework. Child and Family Training was established to provide training and further developments

Samaa El Abd

Dr Samaa El Abd is a British Egyptian Child and Adolescent Consultant Neuropsychiatrist at Guy’s hospital with a particular responsibility for the management of neurodevelopmental disorders. She has a special interest in the interaction between developmental and behavioural disorders and the use of psychopharmacology. Dr El Abd has worked at the University of Cairo, the University of Zurich and the University of London (St. George’s Hospital Medical School and Guy’s Hospital). Having trained and worked in the UK since 1985, she has developed a special interest and expertise in developmental neuropsychiatric disorders, impact of chronic illness, provision of second opinions on complicated cases or cases requiring advanced psychopharmacology. She obtained the degrees of MSc (ped) and MRCPsych (London) and has completed her CCST (certificate of Completion of Specialist Training) (London). Alongside her clinical career, she is a researcher and combines her academic skills with day-to-day clinical work. She lectures at both national and international conferences and has published widely. Dr El Abd is currently working as a Consultant child and adolescent developmental neuropsychiatrist at Guy’s Hospital (University of London) in the South London and Maudsley NHS (National Health Service) Trust and has been there since 1999

Jenny Gray OBE

Jenny Gray OBE has been in children and families social work, management and policy development since 1979. Jenny joined the Social Services Inspectorate, Department of Health in 1991 and led the development of the new inspection methodologies. In 1995, she was appointed as the professional adviser to the British government on safeguarding children, firstly in the Department of Health and then in the Department for Education. Jenny held this post until September 2012.

Jenny is now a social work consultant, working in both the UK and internationally. Jenny is a Child and Family Training Director and an Honorary Lecturer at UCL Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health, London.

Jenny, together with Dr Arnon Bentovim, edited the HfCF Intervention Guides for Practitioners. She delivers training both in the UK and internationally.

In 2007, Jenny was awarded The Order of the British Empire and an Honorary Fellowship of the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health. She was President and CEO of the International Society for the Prevention of Child Abuse and Neglect from 2012 to 2014.

Stephen Pizzey

Stephen Pizzey has been a practising social worker in the field of child- care since 1976. He is Chair of the Board of Directors of Child and Family Training.  He was the Head of the Social Work Department at Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children and shared responsibility for child protection at the hospital. He has been the Independent Chair of an Area Child Protection Committee. Now he undertakes a range of independent social work assessments in care proceedings, reports in actions for damages against local authorities including cases of historical abuse and prepares serious case reviews. Stephen has co-written several training manuals for delivering training on the use of evidence-based approaches to assessment, analysis, and planning interventions both in the UK and internationally.

References

Baglivio, M.T., Epps, N., Swartz, K., Huq, M. S., Sheer, A. & Hardt, N.S. (2014). The Prevalence of Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) in the Lives of Juvenile Offenders. Journal of Juvenile Justice 3(2): 1–23.

Bentovim, A. (2017a). Promoting children and young people’s health, development and wellbeing. In A. Bentovim & J. Gray (Eds.), Hope for Children and Families: Building on strengths, overcoming difficulties. York, UK: Child and Family Training.

Bentovim, A. (2017b). Modifying abusive and neglectful parenting. In A. Bentovim and J. Gray (Eds.). Hope for Children and Families: Building on strengths, overcoming difficulties. York, UK: Child and Family Training.

Bentovim, A., & Elliott, I. (2014). Targeting abusive parenting and the associated impairment of children. Journal of Clinical Child & Adolescent Psychology, 74, 482-488.

Bentovim, A., & Gray, J. (Eds.). (2016; 2017; 2018). Hope for children and families: Building on strengths, overcoming difficulties. York, UK: Child and Family Training.

Bentovim, A., Gray, J., Heasman, P., & Pizzey, S. (2017). Engagement and goal setting. In A. Bentovim and J. Gray (Eds.), Hope for Children and Families: Building on strengths, overcoming difficulties. York, UK: Child and Family Training.

Bevilaqua, L., Kelly, Y. Heilman, A., Priest, N. & Lacey, R. (2021) Adverse childhood experiences and trajectories of internalising and externalising, and prosocial behaviours from childhood to adolescence Child Abuse and Neglect 112. 104890

Chorpita, B.F., & Weisz, J.R. (2009). Modular Approach to Children with Anxiety, Depression, Trauma and Conduct Match-ADTC. Satellite Beach FL: PracticeWise LCC.

Chorpita, B.F., & Daleiden, E.L. (2009). Mapping evidence-based treatments for children and adolescents: Application of the distillation and matching model to 615 treatments from 322 randomized trials. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 77(3), 566-579.

Department of Health, Department for Education and Employment, & Home Office. (2000). The Framework for the Assessment of Children in Need and their Families. London, UK: The Stationery Office.

Eldridge, H. (2016). Working with child sexual abuse. In A. Bentovim & J. Gray (Eds.), Hope for Children and Families: building on strengths, overcoming difficulties. York, UK: Child and Family Training.

Eldridge, H. (2017). Working with children and young people: Addressing disruptive behaviour. In A. Bentovim and J. Gray (Eds.), Hope for Children and Families: building on strengths, overcoming difficulties. York, UK: Child and Family Training.

Finkelhor, D., Omrod, R.K, & Turner, H.A. (2007). Polyvictimisation: a neglected component in child Abuse and Neglect. Child Abuse and Neglect 31, 7-26.

Ford, T., John, A. & Gunnell, D. (2021). Mental health of children and young people during pandemic. BMJ 2021; 372: n614.

Gates, C., & Peters, J. (2017). Promoting attachment, attuned responsiveness and positive emotional relationships. In A. Bentovim and J. Gray (Eds.), Hope for Children and Families: building on strengths, overcoming difficulties. York, UK: Child and Family Training.

Jolliffe, C. (2016). Working with families.  In A. Bentovim & J. Gray (Eds.), Hope for Children and Families: Building on strengths, overcoming difficulties. York, UK: Child and Family Training.

Lawrance, E., Thompson, R., Fontana, G. & Jennings, N. (2021). The impact of climate change on mental health and emotional well-being, implications for policy and practice. Institute of global health innovation. Grantham Institute.

Lewis, S.J., Arseneault, L, Caspi, A., Fisher, H.L., Mathews, T., Moffitt, T., & Danese, A. (2019). The epidemiology of trauma and post-traumatic stress disorder in a representative cohort of young people in England and Wales. Lancet Psychiatry, 6, 247 – 256.

Marchette, L.K. & Weisz, J.R. (2017). Empirical Evolution of youth psychotherapy towards transdiagnostic approaches. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 58, 970–984.

McCrory, E., Gerin, M. I., & Viding, E. (2017). Child maltreatment. Latent vulnerability, and the shift to preventative psychiatry – The contribution of functional brain imaging. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 58, 338–357.

Roberts, R. (2016). Promoting positive parenting.  In A. Bentovim and J. Gray (Eds.), Hope for Children and Families: building on strengths, overcoming difficulties. York, UK: Child and Family Training.

Teicher, M.H., Samson, J.A., Anderson, C.M., & Ohashi, K. (2016). The effects of childhood maltreatment on brain structure, function and connectivity. Nature Reviews Neuroscience, 17, 652-666. doi: 10.1038/nrn.2016.111.

Thompson, R., Litrownik, A.J., Isbell, P., Everson, M.D., English, D.J., Dubowitz, H., Proctor, L.J., & Flaherty, E.G. (2012). Adverse experiences and suicidal ideation in adolescence: Exploring the link using the LONGSCAN samples Psychology of Violence, 2(2), 211-225. doi: 10.1037/a0027107.

Turner, H., & Finkelhor, D. (2020). Strengthening the predictive power of screening for adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) in younger and older children. Child Abuse and Neglect 107: 104522/

Weeramanthri, T. (2016). Working with children and young people: Addressing emotional and traumatic responses.  In A. Bentovim and J. Gray (Eds.). Hope for Children and Families: Building on strengths, overcoming difficulties. York, UK: Child and Family Training.

Wood, S., Ford, K., Hardcastle, K., Hopkins, J., Hughes, K. & Bellis, M. (2020) ACEs in child refugee and asylum-seeking populations. Public Health Wales.

Pricing and booking

  • Members £175
  • Non-members £195

Prices also include exclusive access to all lectures for up to 28 days. Plus all delegates receive an electronic CPD certificate.

To book simply click on this link or the button at the top of the page and fill in the details. ACAMH Members should sign in first to ensure that they get their discount.

If you are not an ACAMH Member now is a great time to join and make a saving on this event. Take a look at the different levels of membership on offer.

Remember ACAMH is a charity and any surplus made is reinvested back to the benefit of our members and the industry as a whole.