January 2021 – The Bridge

Stephanie Lewis
Dr. Stephanie Lewis is a Clinical Lecturer in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience (IoPPN), King’s College London. She studied medicine at Imperial College London, and since graduating has undertaken integrated clinical and academic training, including psychiatry training at South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust and the IoPPN. She is currently undertaking an MRC Clinical Research Training Fellowship, and continues to work as a psychiatrist in child and adolescent mental health services.

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Welcome to the January 2021 issue of The Bridge, click on the front cover to download the issue as a pdf or read the individual January 2021 articles online.

 

This issue of The Bridge features summaries of recent child and adolescent mental health research. I hope you enjoy reading about this excellent work which improves our understanding of a wide range of conditions and informs mental health care for young people.

If you’d like to know more about some studies we feature, or you’d like to build skills in critical appraisal of research, consider joining our informal journal club sessions called CAMHS around the Campfire, led by ACAMH and the Mental Elf. During each free online webinar, a panel of experts discuss a research paper and its implications for young people, and answer questions posed by the audience. The expert panels include researchers, clinicians, and young people with lived experience, who provide their unique perspectives.

At our first CAMHS around the Campfire, held last month, we had a really thoughtful and informative discussion about sleep, anxiety, and depression in young people, based on a paper recently featured in The Bridge. If you missed the webinar and would like to catch up, you can find the recording and resources here.

At our next CAMHS around the Campfire, on Thursday 28th January at 5pm GMT, we will discuss a qualitative study which explored adolescents’ experiences of voice hearing. This research, conducted by Dr Sarah Parry and Dr Filippo Varese, found that voices heard by young people can have a range of forms and functions. This interesting research is summarised in this issue of The Bridge. To join our discussion about this topic at the next CAMHS around the Campfire, book your place.

Please read on to find out about this and many other important studies.

Articles from the December 2020 edition

Cognitive inflexibility contributes to both externalising and internalising difficulties in ASD

Do children with social anxiety disorder benefit from social skills training?

Sleep problems from infancy are linked with impaired well-being in middle childhood

How effective is medication for ADHD symptoms in children with ASD?

Do brain function abnormalities lead to substance use, or vice versa?

Voice-hearing can be positive for some young people

Can childcare attendance reduce externalising behaviour in children exposed to adversity?

Emotional abuse during childhood is linked with differences in brain structure

How does parenting style affect development in infants with a visual impairment?

How much do we really know about ‘Theraplay’ for young children?

Mothers’ prenatal BMI is linked with foetal brain connectivity

Which disorders precede the development of mood disorders in young people?

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