Attachment

  • A harsh parenting team?

    Guest blog from Dr Rachel Latham, Postdoctoral Research Associate, King’s College London on whether high quality coparenting can buffer children’s behaviour from the negative impact of harsh parenting.

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  • Detaching RAD from DSED: the rationale and research requirements

    In order to view this content, you need to be an ACAMH member. Membership starts from just 11p a day. We hope you consider joining and being part of the advancement of child and adolescent mental health.

    Current members will need to be registered as a website user and log in, our guide to this simple process can be accessed here.

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  • Early adversity impacts on associative learning

    Exposure to adversity during childhood negatively impacts on behavioural development due to suboptimal associative learning, according to data from a new study.

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  • Low activity levels affect child mental development

    High activity levels (AL) in early childhood are associated with sub-optimal social and behavioural outcomes, but whether low AL have negative outcomes is unclear. Now, a study conducted by researchers at Boston University has demonstrated that AL are curvilinearly related to mental development.

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  • Rumination affects mother–infant interactions

    In order to view this content, you need to be an ACAMH member. Membership starts from just 11p a day. We hope you consider joining and being part of the advancement of child and adolescent mental health.

    Current members will need to be registered as a website user and log in, our guide to this simple process can be accessed here.

    Read more
  • Processing speed determines dyslexia risk

    Males exhibit a lower average reading performance than females, according to new data from Anne Arnett and colleagues. The researchers devised a framework to first validate the apparent sex difference in prevalence of dyslexia and then determine which cognitive correlates may underlie this difference.

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  • Positive news on the Peer Education Project

    A new school-based programme by the Mental Health Foundation called the Peer Education Project (PEP) has been making leaps and bounds in tackling rising issues with mental health in young people.

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  • Professor Helen Minnis

    Is childhood maltreatment a risk factor for increased symptoms of neurodevelopmental disorders?

    Professor Helen Minnis and Lisa Dinkler discuss their paper “Maltreatment-associated neurodevelopmental disorders: a co-twin control analysis” published in the Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry.

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  • Guest Blog

    How do new family forms affect children’s mental health?

    New family forms, including single-parent households, gay or lesbian parents, and those with children born through assisted reproduction methods like IVF and surrogacy, are becoming ever more common. Professor Susan Golombok, Director of the Centre for Family Research at the University of Cambridge, elaborates on the impacts of these family forms on children’s mental health.

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  • Guest Blog

    The inclusive nature of bereavement – all children grieve

    Individuals with special educational needs and disabilities are also affected by bereavement, including children with the severest SEND.

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