Taking mental health outdoors: from prevention to intervention

11


Event type Live Stream

Webinar
15:45 - 18:10 UK, 16:45 - 19:10 CET, 11:45 - 2:10 EST
EARLY NOW ON UNTIL MONDAY 3 June

Children using magnifying glass to look at a leaf in the woods

Research is increasingly showing the benefits of spending time outdoors on our mental health. These studies are often about adults rather than children and young people, and about how spending free time outdoors can be of benefit. However, there is less known about how and why we might support young people to be outdoors to prevent mental health problems, or in treatment settings if they do have poor mental health.

Booking

Sign up at this link or on the Book Now button at the top of the screen, and complete the form that follows. You’ll then receive an email confirmation and a link to the webinar, plus we’ll send you a calendar reminder nearer the time. All delegates receive a CPD certificate via email.

  • ACAMH Members MUST login to book onto the webinar in order to access this webinar and get a CPD certificate
  • Non-members this is a great time to join ACAMH, take a look at what we have to offer, and make the saving on these sessions

EARLY BIRD – £15 ACAMH Members until Monday 3 June (then £30)

EARLY BIRD – £30 Non Members until Monday 3 June (then £45) Join now and save

£5 Undergraduate / Postgraduate Members

FREE for ACAMH Low and Middle Income Countries Members

Don’t forget as a charity any surplus made is reinvested back as we work to our vision of ‘Sharing best evidence, improving practice’, and our mission to ‘Improve the mental health and wellbeing of young people aged 0-25’. 

About the event

In this event, we will hear from three speakers who have researched different aspects of this topic. First, we will explore outdoor time as a mechanism to reduce mental health problems at a public health level, hearing the results of the Open Sky School randomised controlled trial conducted in Canada. Then, we will think about how Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS) deliver treatments, with the “CAMHS goes wild” project showcasing outdoor treatment delivery for those with moderate mental health difficulties. Finally, we will demonstrate how nature and the outdoors can be incorporated for those with severe mental health problems, learning from the NatureWell CAMHS qualitative service evaluation.

Key learning points

  • To understand whether or not robust evaluation of an outdoor based intervention for school children demonstrates evidence that this reduces mental health problems for children
  • To learn about approaches to integrate the outdoors into mental health prevention and treatment in CAMHS
  • To think critically about how and why attendees could integrate more outdoor activities, or evaluate these, to add to the evidence base

Who should attend

Practitioners in clinical, education, health or social care roles, school staff working with children and families, charities and third sector organisations supporting children and families, academics and researchers.

About the talks

Spending time in nature has been associated to positive outcomes for mental health in observational studies. However, experimental research in this domain is lacking and little is known about the effectiveness of nature-based interventions with an emphasis on greenspace exposure for reducing children’s mental heath symptoms in school settings. We conducted a cluster randomized control trial to test the effectiveness of Open Sky School, a 12-week intervention designed to reduce emotional (e.g. internalizing and externalizing symptoms) and social problems in school-aged children residing in Quebec, Canada. 53 teachers from 33 schools and 1015 of their 5th and 6th grade students were randomly assigned to an intervention or waitlist control group. Teachers in the intervention group dedicated 2 hours per week over 12 weeks to mental health and pedagogical activities in greenspaces located in close proximity to their schools. Those in the control group practiced education as usual. We explored whether mental health symptoms were reduced immediately following the 12-week intervention. This talk will present the results of the Open Sky School study, shedding light on the children the intervention may support, while also underlining the program’s development, implementation, and teachers’ experiences conducting the program. We will also explore the feasibility of implementing outdoor interventions in light of our study’s findings.

Key learning points

  1. To understand whether Open Sky School can reduce mental health problems for school-aged children.
  2. To outline the development and implementation of Open Sky School, including details on how teachers were trained and supported to implement the intervention.
  3. To understand the practical challenges, benefits, and implications of integrating nature-based interventions in school settings.

Programme

15:45 – 15:55 Dr. Abby Russell, ACAMH Devon and Cornwall Branch Chair – Welcome and intro

15:55 – 16:25 Associate Professor Dr. Marie-Claude Geoffroy – Open Sky School: findings from a randomised controlled trial testing the effectiveness of a nature-based intervention on the mental health of elementary school children

16:25 – 16:30 Q&A

16:30 – 17:00 Dr. Beth ChapmanCAMHS Goes Wild

17:05 – 17:15 Q&A

17:15 – 17:25 Break

17:25 – 17:55 Dr. Catriona Mellor – Bringing nature into CAMHS inpatient services: reflections on NatureWell CAMHS

17:55 – 18:10 Q&A and round up

About the speakers

Marie-Claude Geoffroy

Marie-Claude Geoffroy is a clinical psychologist and an Associate Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at McGill University and the Douglas Mental Health University Institute. She holds a Canada Research Chair in Youth Suicide Prevention and Mental Health Promotion and is a member of the College of New Scholars of the Royal Society of Canada. With over 100 peer-reviewed articles, including in influential journals such as Lancet Psychiatry, JAMA Psychiatry, and the Canadian Medical Association Journal, her research focuses on understanding the social determinants that influence suicide in youth; improving the mental well-being of all youth; preventing suicide in vulnerable youth through preventative strategies; and disseminating knowledge to raise awareness about youth mental health and inspire hope. She leads a Quebec inter-university research initiative on youth suicide prevention and advises on various governmental and non-governmental suicide prevention initiatives in Quebec, Canada, and worldwide.

Booking

Sign up at this link or on the Book Now button at the top of the screen, and complete the form that follows. You’ll then receive an email confirmation and a link to the webinar, plus we’ll send you a calendar reminder nearer the time. All delegates receive a CPD certificate via email.

  • ACAMH Members MUST login to book onto the webinar in order to access this webinar and get a CPD certificate
  • Non-members this is a great time to join ACAMH, take a look at what we have to offer, and make the saving on these sessions

EARLY BIRD – £15 ACAMH Members until Monday 3 June (then £30)

EARLY BIRD – £30 Non Members until Monday 3 June (then £45) Join now and save

£5 Undergraduate / Postgraduate Members

FREE for ACAMH Low and Middle Income Countries Members