Understanding and supporting children looked after and adopted children

12


Event type Webinar

Webinar, via Zoom
14:00 - 16:00 UK time, 15:00 - 17:00 CET, 08:00 - 10:00 EST.
Bookings close on Tuesday 12 March, 12:00 UK time, 13:00 CET, 06:00 EST.

daughter and dad playing

This webinar will focus on the mental health of children looked after and adopted children. It is recognised that the children looked after population is often on clinical caseloads, yet there appears to be little discussion around both the impact of their early life experiences on their neuropsychology, and the practical aspects of working with this specific population due to this.

Whilst every child is going to experience a varying degree of adverse childhood experiences, this population is a unique one given that there is often a lack of stability in their environment. Therefore, more attention and understanding is needing when working with this population.

We are delighted to welcome Professor Katherine Shelton, of Cardiff University, and Lowri Roberts, Assistant Educational Psychologist for Children Looked After, from Neath Port Talbot Local Authority.

Booking

Sign up at this link or on the Book Now button at the top of the screen, and complete the form that follows. You’ll then receive an email confirmation and a link to the webinar, plus we’ll send you a calendar reminder nearer the time.

  • ACAMH Members MUST login to book onto the webinar in order to access this webinar for free and get a CPD certificate
  • Non-members this is a great time to join ACAMH, take a look at what we have to offer, and make the saving on these sessions

£30 ACAMH Members

£45 Non Members Join now and save, membership starts from £5

£5 Undergraduate / Postgraduate Members

FREE for ACAMH Low and Middle Income Countries Members

Don’t forget as a charity any surplus made is reinvested back as we work to our vision of ‘Sharing best evidence, improving practice’, and our mission to ‘Improve the mental health and wellbeing of young people aged 0-25’. 

Key learning takeways

  1. An understanding of the mental health and neuropsychological profiles of children adopted from care.
  2. An understanding of the experiences of family life in the 5 years after adoption, including relationship quality and changes in employment patterns.
  3. A sense of how children’s mental health is associated with family functioning.
  4. An understanding of ways of working and supporting children looked after.

About the talks

Katherine SheltonThe neuro-psychological and mental health profiles of children adopted from care: support needs in the context of family formation

Early life adversity can have profound and long-term consequences for neurodevelopment. There is considerable evidence that exposure to early life stress, such as neglect and maltreatment, can result in alterations to pertinent neurobiological systems associated with cognitive dysfunction and increase vulnerability to mental health problems. Most children adopted from the public care system in the UK are removed from their birth family following experiences of abuse or neglect. As an intervention, adoption drastically alters a child’s circumstances in a way which may compensate for adversity experienced in early life. However, adoptees remain more likely to experience emotional and behavioural problems that endure into later life. Adopted children are also overrepresented within clinical settings and lag their classmates academically. The Wales Adoption Cohort Study (which began in 2015) had the overarching aim of increasing understanding of the factors that supported successful outcomes for Welsh children adopted from care. In my presentation I will: 1) profile the neuropsychological and mental health of Welsh children adopted from care in 2015 and consider the impact of family relationship quality on later psychological health and 2) examine post adoption family life including consideration of support needs and unanswered questions about the link between relationship quality and children’s outcomes. My third aim is to consider some of the applications of the Cohort Study findings in the sphere of policy and practice.

Key learning takeaways

  1. An understanding of the mental health and neuropsychological profiles of children adopted from care.
  2. An understanding of the experiences of family life in the 5 years after adoption, including relationship quality and changes in employment patterns.
  3. A sense of how children’s mental health is associated with family functioning in the context of adoption.

Lowri Roberts – The role of the Assistant Educational Psychologist for Children Looked After

Lowri will present a range of insights and psychological approaches that she uses in her role as an Assistant Educational Psychologist when working with children looked after and those with social emotional and behavioural needs.

Who should attend

This conference is suitable for anyone working with children and young people. It is appropriate for clinicians, mental and physical health professionals in all settings, i.e. primary, secondary, tertiary care. Also those working in education, social care, and youth-based services would find the session stimulating and useful for their work.

Programme

14:00 Introduction

14:05 Professor Katherine Shelton – The neuro-psychological and mental health profiles of children adopted from care: support needs in the context of family formation.

14:50 Q&A

15:00 Lowri Roberts – The role of the Assistant Educational Psychologist for Children Looked After

15:45 Q&A

15:55 Closing comments

16:00 End

About the speakers

Katherine SheltonProfessor Katherine Shelton, Cardiff University. Katherine is a developmental psychologist with 20 years experience of research and teaching in the field of family functioning and child development. Her research is focused on identifying and understanding the psychological and social needs of vulnerable children and young people. Over the past 8 years, she has led an inter-disciplinary, longitudinal study investigating the experiences and early support needs of adoptive families and their children.

Lowri Roberts is an Assistant Educational Psychologist for Children Looked After working at Neath Port Talbot Local Authority. In her role she works with children and young people to support their wellbeing, development and social emotional behavioural needs in education. She has an interest in using technology to engage and empower the voices of children looked after. Additionally, she facilitates a range of trauma-informed training for professionals, parents/carers and school staff who are part of the community supporting children looked after.

Booking

Sign up at this link or on the Book Now button at the top of the screen, and complete the form that follows. You’ll then receive an email confirmation and a link to the webinar, plus we’ll send you a calendar reminder nearer the time.

  • ACAMH Members MUST login to book onto the webinar in order to access this webinar for free and get a CPD certificate
  • Non-members this is a great time to join ACAMH, take a look at what we have to offer, and make the saving on these sessions

£30 ACAMH Members

£45 Non Members Join now and save, membership starts from £5

£5 Undergraduate / Postgraduate Members

FREE for ACAMH Low and Middle Income Countries Members

Don’t forget as a charity any surplus made is reinvested back as we work to our vision of ‘Sharing best evidence, improving practice’, and our mission to ‘Improve the mental health and wellbeing of young people aged 0-25’.