Speech and Developmental Language Disorders – Judy Dunn International Conference 2022

16


Event type International Conference - 2 day online

EARLY BIRD OFFER!
Online
Wednesday 16 November 2022
13:15 - 16:00 UK, 14:15 - 17:00 CET, 09:15 - 12 noon EST
Thursday 17 November 2022
13:15 - 16:00 UK, 14:15 - 17:00 CET, 09:15 - 12 noon EST
Recordings are available for 90 days after the event.

boy, speech disorder mouthing letter O

We are delighted to release early details of the upcoming Judy Dunn International Conference 2022 on Speech and Developmental Language Disorders. Currently, treatment for Developmental Language Disorders is variable and many common approaches lack a sound evidence base. When it comes to language / communication disorders, many practitioners in CAMHS may feel out of their comfort zone. Fill this gap attending the Judy Dunn Conference to learn all you need to know about the clinical presentation and management of language/ communication disorders. This conference will look at the evidence and examples available to provide effective interventions as developed by some of the leading figures in the field of Speech and Developmental Language Disorder.

Confirmed speakers

Professor Courtenay Norbury, Professor of Developmental Language & Communication Disorders, UCL – talk title  ‘Prevalence and Persistence of Language Disorders’

Professor Julie Dockrell, Professor of Psychology and Special Needs at Institute of Education, University of London – talk title ‘Supporting oral language skills in early years: challenges and opportunities’

Professor Charles Hulme, is Professor of Psychology and Education in the Department of Education and William Golding Senior Research Fellow at Brasenose College ‘Identifying and ameliorating children’s language difficulties’

Baroness Sheila Hollins, Crossbench Peer, House of Lords, Emeritus Professor of Psychiatry at St George’s, Founder and Chair of Books Beyond Words – talk title ‘Improving mental health, emotional literacy and empathy in children using pictures and stories’ 

Emma James, Postdocotral research associate, Stipendiary Lecturer, St Catherine’s College, University Oxford

More speakers to be confirmed soon.

Prices and booking

Early bird offer, available until 29 September 17:00 UK time

£79 – ACAMH Members, then £99 after early bird

£119 – Non Members, then £139 after early bird – Join now and save

£5 – ACAMH Undergraduate & Masters Members, at all times

FREE – International members

To book simply click the button at the top of the page, or this link, and fill in the details. ACAMH Members should sign in first to ensure that they get their discount. If you are not an ACAMH Member now is a great time to join and make a saving on this event. Take a look at the different levels of membership on offer.

Who should attend

This day would be particularly beneficial to all those who work with children affected with mental health issues, in particular in the area of speech and language. It will be of particular interest to those conducting research in the field of child and adolescent mental health, Child and Adolescent Psychiatrists and Psychologists, Speciality Doctors, Clinicians, Nurse Practitioners, Investigators, and those with an interest in child and adolescent mental health.

Additionally, it is also relevant to those working in education, such as Educational Psychologists, and those with a pastoral care responsibility, plus those who oversee youth work such as Social Workers.

About the talks

Professor Courtenay Norbury, Professor of Developmental Language & Communication Disorders, UCL

‘Prevalence and Persistence of Language Disorders’ – In this talk I will present data from a 10-year longitudinal study of language development and disorder in over 500 children from school entry through the transition to secondary school. Language abilities from school entry are incredibly stable, meaning that despite progress, gaps between children with language deficits and their peers are maintained throughout primary school and into secondary school. Language disorders affect ~10% of the primary school population, though prevalence is greater in areas of socio-economic deprivation. Our data also show that early language is predictive of later skill in emotion recognition and emotion regulation, representing one potential mechanism through which early language disorders give rise to mental health challenges in adolescence. I will conclude with a brief discussion of what these findings mean for intervention. Not only is there a need for early intervention, but there will also be a need for on-going support to reduce the risk of negative outcomes in mental health. In addition, consideration of how language affects access to mental health interventions is a priority for future research and practice.

Key takeaways

  1. To understand the nature of Developmental Language Disorder
  2. To understand the links between language and social/emotional well-being
  3. To understand the implications of language stability for intervention

Baroness Sheila Hollins, Crossbench Peer, House of Lords, Emeritus Professor of Psychiatry at St George’s, Founder and Chair of Books Beyond Words

‘Improving mental health, emotional literacy and empathy in children using pictures and stories’ – This talk will focus on the experience of running Feeling´s Groups in mainstream and SEND primary schools and using Beyond Words pictures and stories to enable children to talk about their feelings. The use of visual literature with primary age children who are experiencing mental ill health and/or emotional distress has enabled children to understand the feelings they are experiencing, increase their emotional vocabulary and build empathy for other children. This talk will demonstrate the importance of using visual literature in the classroom and in small group and 1:1 sessions to improve children´s mental health. Dealing with topics such as bereavement, abuse and bullying can be challenging for teachers and this talk shows how training, mentoring and a whole school approach to dealing with mental health has enabled teachers to approach ´taboo´ topics sensitively and to positive effect through Beyond Words Open Book Project. This talk will include perspectives from Professor Barry Carpenter, Headteacher Georgina Fletcher, SEND teacher Leigh Blakeman and Open Book trainer and teacher, Marie Grant.

Key takeaways

  1. Understanding the role of pictures and stories in building mental health, emotional literacy and empathy.
  2. Understand how Beyond Words stories can be used as a tool in primary school, SEND schools and in mental health settings.
  3. Understand the need for teachers to develop confidence and skills in talking about ´taboo´ topics.

About the speakers

Professor Courtenay Norbury
Professor Courtenay Norbury

Courtenay Norbury is Professor of Developmental Disorders of Language and Communication at Psychology and Language Sciences, University College London. She is the Director of the Literacy, Language and Communication (LiLaC) Lab and a Fellow of the Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists.

She obtained her PhD in Experimental Psychology at the University of Oxford, working with Professor Dorothy Bishop on the overlapping language profiles that characterise autism spectrum disorder and ‘specific’ language impairment. Professor Norbury’s current research focuses on language disorders and how language interacts with other aspects of development. She is leading SCALES, a population study of language development and disorder from school entry. She is also a founding member of the RADLD campaign.

Baroness Shelia Hollins
Baroness Shelia Hollins

Baroness Hollins, is a Crossbench Peer, House of Lords, Emeritus Professor of Psychiatry at St George’s, Founder and Chair of Books Beyond Words. Books Beyond Words are award-winning wordless picture stories covering topics including physical and mental health, lifestyle and relationships, abuse and trauma, grief and bereavement, employment, and criminal justice. Each story is co-created with and for people who find pictures easier to understand than words. This includes people with learning disabilities and/or autism, people with cognitive or communication difficulties, such as Dementia, people who have difficulty with reading, including some Deaf people, and people who do not use the language of the country where they are living. She is a former President of the Royal College of Psychiatrists, President of the British Medical Association, and Chair of the BMA Board of Science. In 2014 Pope Francis appointed her a member of the newly created Pontifical Commission for the Protection of Minors. She is also a member of the Scientific Advisory Board of the Centre for Child Protection and is President of the Royal Medical Benevolent Fund. In 2019 she was appointed by the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care to Chair the Oversight Panel to oversee Independent Care, Education and Treatment Reviews of people placed in Long Term Segregation.

Professor Charles Hulme
Professor Charles Hulme

Charles Hulme is Professor of Psychology and Education in the Department of Education and William Golding Senior Research Fellow at Brasenose College. He has broad research interests in reading, language and memory processes and their development and is an expert on randomized controlled trials in Education. His work on reading development has made important contributions to understanding the role of phonological skills in learning to read. He has also explored the role of wider language skills (particularly vocabulary knowledge and grammatical skills) as influences on the development of reading comprehension. His publications include a number of assessment materials including the Phonological Abilities Test (1997), the York Assessment of Reading for Comprehension (YARC, 2009) and Sound Linkage (2014) as well as several books dealing with various aspects of reading development. He is the former Editor-in –Chief of the journal ‘Scientific Studies of Reading’ (2007-2009) and a former Senior Editor of the Association of Psychological Science’s flagship journal, Psychological Science (2012-2019).

In 2009 he published “Developmental disorders of language, learning and cognition” (Wiley-Blackwell; co-authored with Maggie Snowling). He holds an honorary doctorate from the University of Oslo (2014) and is a member of Academia Europea and a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences. He received the Feitelson Research Award from the International Reading Association (1998) and the Marion Welchman International Award for Contributions to the study of Dyslexia from the British Dyslexia Association (2016).  He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences, a Fellow of Academia Europaea and a Fellow of the British Academy. Charles Hulme would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics: Developmental dyslexia, reading comprehension impairment, development of arithmetic skills, reading and language intervention. Bio via University of Oxford

Emma James
Emma James

My primary research interests are in language learning and literacy development. I am currently a postdoctoral researcher working with Professor Kate Nation, examining the precursors and consequences of comprehension difficulties using the ALSPAC cohort. I completed my undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology at the University of Oxford (2010-2013), and subsequently spent a year as a Research Associate at Lancaster University. I moved to the University of York in 2014, where I completed a Masters, PhD and Postdoctoral Fellowship as part of the Sleep, Language and Memory Lab. My previous research was on individual differences in language learning: how is it that some children come to acquire new vocabulary more easily than others, and how might the learning mechanisms change as we grow older? My PhD studies addressed these questions by examining the influence of prior knowledge on learning new words. In ongoing research, I hope to bridge gaps between small-scale experiments and learning in practice by using naturally occurring datasets. Bio and image via University of Oxford

To book

Simply click the button at the top of the page, or this link, and fill in the details. ACAMH Members should sign in first to ensure that they get their discount. If you are not an ACAMH Member now is a great time to join and make a saving on this event. Take a look at the different levels of membership on offer.