Global Mental Health: policy interventions to protect young people’s mental health

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EARLY BIRD OPEN UNTIL 15 APRIL
Webinar
Thursday 27 June and Friday 28 June 13:00-16:30 UK Time, 14:00-17:30 CET, 08:30-11:30 EST
Bookings clone on Thursday 27 June 09:30 UK time
All delegates will have access to a recording of the session for 90 days after the event (from 1 July 2024)
All delegates receive a CPD certificate via email.

Fist bump adult and child

We are delighted to present ‘Global Mental Health: policy interventions to protect young people’s mental health’, the 2024 Jack Tizard Memorial International Conference.

Booking

Sign up at this link or on the Book Now button at the top of the screen, and complete the form that follows. You’ll then receive an email confirmation and a link to the webinar, plus we’ll send you a calendar reminder nearer the time. All delegates will have access to a recording of the session for 90 days after the event (from 1 July 2024). All delegates receive a CPD certificate via email.

  • ACAMH Members MUST login to book onto the webinar in order to access this webinar and get a CPD certificate
  • Non-members this is a great time to join ACAMH, take a look at what we have to offer, and make the saving on these sessions

£79 ACAMH Members (then £99 after 15 April)

£119 Non Members (then £99 after 15 April) Join now and save

£5 Undergraduate / Postgraduate Members

FREE for ACAMH Low and Middle Income Countries Members

Don’t forget as a charity any surplus made is reinvested back as we work to our vision of ‘Sharing best evidence, improving practice’, and our mission to ‘Improve the mental health and wellbeing of young people aged 0-25’. 

About the conference

Youth mental health is now recognised to be a critical and important component of life chances. Providing timely and effective treatment and care is essential, yet services even in high income countries are under strain. There are long waiting lists, insufficient numbers of skilled clinicians and community supports, and schools struggle to provide interventions to many who appear not to meet diagnostic thresholds. The global context offers fresh perspectives, in that 80% of the worlds young people live in low and middle income countries, where there are few services, clinicians, or infrastructure. Models from high income countries will not work there.

Global practices have to reflect this lack of resource, investment and infrastructure. Innovative low cost interventions are being pioneered in low and middle income countries, and offer invaluable lessons for high income countries, where we are unable to meet the needs of young people.

Youth mental health care is in crisis in the UK and high income countries, where we struggle to provide sufficient and appropriate care. We need new solutions and innovation in models of effective support and care and treatment. This series of talks brings together experts in child and adolescent mental health, who are innovating new ways of providing care and support instead of, or alongside, conventional psychiatric and psychological intervention where it exists. The variation in global policies, legislation, access to interventions offers new perspectives on what effective services, treatment, and care can look like. The presenters also provide lessons for culturally competent, safe, effective care for children around the world, sharing expertise and solutions for adaptation and implementation.

Learning objectives

  • Taking a transdiagnostic perspective, the speakers will set out public health, community, social and health systems evidence on what works for whom and where.
  • How might we learn to adapt our practices in high income countries to meet the needs of our communities through tasking shifting, new workforces, and novel interventions for children and parents and schools?
  • What lessons for cultural competency emerge when we interrogate the global rather than our preferred approach in the Global North?
  • How can we work in partnership with scholars and practitioners around the world?
  • How do we (communities, parents, and clinicians) provide appropriate care for eating disorders, autism, depression, in the context of multiple intersectional disadvantages.

About the talks

Professor Soumitra Pathare, ‘How can policy and legislation help improve the treatment of mental illnesses in young people?’
Sustainable Development Goals has suicide rate as an indicator for SDG3 with a target to reduce this by one-third in 2030. India, with 17 per cent of world population, accounts for nearly 26 per cent of suicides in the world.
More than 10,000 children and adolescents under 18 years die by suicide each year. In 2020, the pandemic year, while all suicides in India increased by 10% suicides amongst under 18 year olds increased by 19%. The talk focuses on the paucity of data, potential causes, (lack of) policy action to tackle children and adolescent suicides and data from intervention research projects currently being implemented by our group in India.

Key learning takeaways

  1. To better understand the demography of youth suicide in India
  2. To understand potential interventions for youth suicide prevention in India
  3. To recognize the challenges and need for policy action for suicide prevention in India.

Professor Anuj Kapilashrami and Dr Aparna Joshi, ‘Tackling gender violence and mental health through creative interventions: a cross country study’
Gender-based violence (GBV) is widely prevalent among adolescents and young women in low and middle-income countries. The interplay among various factors situated at different levels of ecology, ranging from a young age and relative lack of experience in managing relationships to rigid gender norms, widespread societal acceptance of violence, and lack of effective socioeconomic and health policies and programmes, contribute to young women’s heightened risk of experiencing GBV (Decker et al.,2015). GBV among adolescents and young women leads to serious health and psychosocial consequences. Drawing from the research work carried out in India, the present session weaves in two strands and focuses on the theme of violence against young women. The first strand, based on a national-level qualitative study, explores young Indian women’s experiences of technology-facilitated gender-based violence, its connections with mental health and their acts of resistance. The second strand builds on another exploratory study uncovering issues of gender-based violence from the health system’s perspectives in India and the strengths and challenges confronting health systems in offering a comprehensive response. Both the strands highlight role of gender norms and its intersections with other social locations in creating layers of marginalisation and powerlessness in young women’s lives and the need for responses that are informed by feminist and social justice approaches.

Who should attend

This meeting will be of interest to practicing mental health workers from a range of professions, researchers from health and social sciences, as well as arts and humanities, political, legislative and policy experts.

Programme

Thursday 27 June 13:00 – 16:30 UK Time

Professor Danuta Wasserman, ‘Global Mental Health Policy: why we need one and what it will do’

Professor David Ndetei, ‘Youth mental health and resilience: new findings on marginalised groups in Kenya’

Professor Nusrat Husain, ‘Play and parenting interventions for promoting and protecting youth mental health’

Professor Ashish Kumar, ‘Global mental health and eating disorders: the importance of accommodation and expressed emotion in young people’

Friday 28 June 13:00 – 16:30 UK Time

Professor Soumitra Pathare, ‘How can policy and legislation help improve the treatment of mental illnesses in young people?’

Professor Siobhan Hugh-Jones, plus colleagues from Bangalore, ‘Using creative participatory arts interventions to support young people with mental illnesses in a global context: findings from India’

Professor Nicola Shaughnessy, ‘Providing mental health care and support for autistic people: is there a global and local consensus?’

Professor Anuj Kapilashrami and Dr Aparna Joshi, ‘Tackling gender violence and mental health through creative interventions: a cross country study’

Booking

Sign up at this link or on the Book Now button at the top of the screen, and complete the form that follows. You’ll then receive an email confirmation and a link to the webinar, plus we’ll send you a calendar reminder nearer the time.

  • ACAMH Members MUST login to book onto the webinar in order to access this webinar and get a CPD certificate
  • Non-members this is a great time to join ACAMH, take a look at what we have to offer, and make the saving on these sessions

£99 ACAMH Members

£139 Non Members Join now and save

£5 Undergraduate / Postgraduate Members

FREE for ACAMH Low and Middle Income Countries Members

Don’t forget as a charity any surplus made is reinvested back as we work to our vision of ‘Sharing best evidence, improving practice’, and our mission to ‘Improve the mental health and wellbeing of young people aged 0-25’.