Sleep

Children and adolescents who are experiencing difficulties with their mental health also often struggle with their sleep. Indeed disrupted or altered sleep has been associated with most psychiatric disorders (Gregory & Sadeh, 2016). Although a range of sleep difficulties can co-occur with mental health problems, a common difficulty is insomnia. As such this guidance will primarily focus on difficulties with getting to sleep and staying asleep.

  • Dr. Bernadka Dubicka

    Dr. Bernadka Dubicka – Editor in Chief

    Editor in Chief, Bernadka is currently Chair of the Royal College of Psychiatrists’ Child and Adolescent Faculty since 2017, working to promote the mental wellbeing of young people and their families. Further, she is a Consultant Psychiatrist at Pennine Care Foundation Trust, involved with leading the research unit, has been an advisor to the National Institute of Health Research Health Technology Assessment panel, and has also served as principle investigator in one of the largest international psychological treatment trials in adolescent depression – Improving Mood with Psychoanalytic and Cognitive Therapies (IMPACT).

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  • Good intentions, good enough?

    Daniel Brennan, Assistant Psychologist at Ealing Intensive Therapeutic and Short Break Service (ITSBS) provides a summary of Lenehan, C. and Geraghty, M.  (2017) “Good intentions, good enough?: a review of the experiences and outcomes of children and young people with learning disabilities in residential special schools and colleges”,

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  • Just what does a learning disability nurse do?

    ”As a clinical nurse specialist, and manager, there is no typical day.”- Julie Blackaby. “It is probably the liveliest and most exciting it has been since the advent of the NHS”- Noeleen Morritt.

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  • Quiz – Sleep Essentials

    Test your knowledge on sleep and mental health with our sleep essentials quiz!

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  • Neuroscience Edition Editorial

    Welcome to this Neuroscience themed edition of The Bridge.

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  • Identifying imaging biomarkers in the neonatal brain

    The past decade has seen great improvements in magnetic resonance imaging technologies, such that it is now possible to image the developing brain in utero. In 2018, Dafnis Batalle and colleagues compiled an Annual Research Review for the Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, where they evaluated the current status of neuroimaging research in neonates and paediatrics to determine the origins of neuropsychiatric and neurodevelopmental disorders.

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  • Coupled delta-beta wave activity might predict social anxiety in children

    Researchers from McMaster University, Canada, have examined whether individual differences in salivary cortisol levels at baseline and parent-reported social anxiety levels are associated with resting, coupled delta–beta frontal wave activity.

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  • A mother’s touch: a key player in fine tuning the function of our genome

    There is debate as to the importance of genetics in determining our behaviour. This debate has become enshrined perhaps due to the early focus of genetics on searching for DNA variation in our genome (termed a polymorphism) that affected protein structure, the hypothesis being that such a protein variant would not be working optimally in our body throughout our life.

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  • Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder

    Our conference on Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders aims to raise awareness and understanding of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) and provide an overview of how individuals and families affected by FASD can be supported. Key takeaways To raise awareness of the prevalence, key features and outcomes of individuals affected by Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD) […]

    Event type
    Conference
    Location
    Dublin
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  • The experiences of healthcare transitions between child and adult services for young people with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: a review of evidence

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is characterised by hyperactivity, inattention and impulsivity. It affects around 5% of children, and can be a long term condition, with research showing that up to two thirds of young people with ADHD will continue to experience symptoms into adulthood. However, many young people with ongoing healthcare needs do not make the necessary transition from child to adult mental health services.

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