Research Digests

  • The family environment mediates risk of self-harming

    Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) constitutes any deliberate physical injury to oneself that is not life-threatening. It is a behaviour that commonly starts during adolescence. Childhood family adversity (CFA) is associated with NSSI, but the risk pathways between CFA and NSSI are unclear.

    Read more
  • The early ASD screening debate continues

    The debate about screening and providing early treatment for young children with, or with high likelihood of, autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is ongoing, but limited data are available to support either side of the argument. Now, a systematic review of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of interventions for children ≤6 years with (or with high likelihood of) ASD has concluded that the available data is currently insufficient to support the argument for early intervention.

    Read more
  • Schools need more specialist support

    Schools have a central role in supporting young people with mental health problems, but the level of and type of support available to affected students is unclear. A convenience sample survey of 577 school staff from 341 schools in England has shed light on this issue.

    Read more
  • School-based interventions are effective, but are they efficient?

    School-based interventions (SBIs) are effective for preventing and treating common medicopsychological problems and disorders in pupils, according to data from a practitioner review published in the Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry.

    Read more
  • Teaching about Tics

    A psychoeducational intervention, in the form of a classroom presentation, can enhance the knowledge and attitudes of peers towards their classmates with Tourette syndrome (TS), according to research by Claire Nussey and colleagues.

    Read more
  • Barriers to sharing information with schools

    A recent study by Tania Hart and Michelle O’Reilly has found that the exchange of information between Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS) and schools needs improving to sufficiently support the educational needs of young people with emotional mental health difficulties.

    Read more
  • iPad App complements ASD therapy

    Children with autism spectrum condition (ASC) may benefit from combined technology-based and traditional interventions, according to new research.

    Read more
  • Digital health interventions for the young: meeting expectations?

    The number of digital health interventions for mental health disorders is increasing, but research from Chris Hollis and colleagues suggests that the clinical benefits and cost-effectiveness are unclear. Consistent methods of reporting and evaluation are required to extract definitive conclusions from clinical trials.

    Read more
  • How research on cyberbullying has developed

    Prof. Peter K. Smith, Goldsmiths, University of London, England
    The topic of cyberbullying is often in the media, because of the distress and harm it can cause. There have been cases where it appears to have contributed significantly to tragic outcomes such as suicide (Livingstone & Smith, 2014).

    Read more
  • mHealth ineffective for depression prevention

    A universal cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT)-based mobile messaging programme (MEMO CBT) designed to prevent teenage onset depression provides no clinical benefit, according to results of a double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled trial.

    Read more