Research Digests

  • Elevated anxiety risk in sexual minority adolescents

    Adolescents that are not exclusively heterosexual (“sexual minority”) are at an increased risk of developing an anxiety disorder compared to their heterosexual counterparts, according to recent data from a prospective birth cohort study.

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  • Rumination affects mother–infant interactions

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  • Processing speed determines dyslexia risk

    Males exhibit a lower average reading performance than females, according to new data from Anne Arnett and colleagues. The researchers devised a framework to first validate the apparent sex difference in prevalence of dyslexia and then determine which cognitive correlates may underlie this difference.

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  • Shared decision making in CAMHS

    With Parents in Mind: Can shared decision making support parents at CAMHS?

    Exploring shared decision making as a triad relationship between clinicians, children and parents where clinicians and service users (i.e. children and parents) share the information when faced with the task of making decisions, and where service users are supported to consider options to achieve informed preferences, may be of value.

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  • The early ASD screening debate continues

    The debate about screening and providing early treatment for young children with, or with high likelihood of, autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is ongoing, but limited data are available to support either side of the argument. Now, a systematic review of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of interventions for children ≤6 years with (or with high likelihood of) ASD has concluded that the available data is currently insufficient to support the argument for early intervention.

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  • Schools need more specialist support

    Schools have a central role in supporting young people with mental health problems, but the level of and type of support available to affected students is unclear. A convenience sample survey of 577 school staff from 341 schools in England has shed light on this issue.

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  • School-based interventions are effective, but are they efficient?

    School-based interventions (SBIs) are effective for preventing and treating common medicopsychological problems and disorders in pupils, according to data from a practitioner review published in the Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry.

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  • Teaching about Tics

    A psychoeducational intervention, in the form of a classroom presentation, can enhance the knowledge and attitudes of peers towards their classmates with Tourette syndrome (TS), according to research by Claire Nussey and colleagues.

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  • Barriers to sharing information with schools

    A recent study by Tania Hart and Michelle O’Reilly has found that the exchange of information between Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS) and schools needs improving to sufficiently support the educational needs of young people with emotional mental health difficulties.

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  • Child & Adolescent Mental Health: Through a digital lens

    Despite the significant increase, availability and usage of mobile devices by children and teenagers, there is still a lack of evidence to support their safety or effectiveness with vulnerable populations. 

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