Internet‐delivered cognitive behavior therapy with minimal therapist support for anxious children and adolescents: predictors of response.

Matt Kempen
Marketing Manager for ACAMH

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Internet‐delivered cognitive behavior therapy with minimal therapist support for anxious children and adolescents: predictors of response. A video abstract from Professor Susan Spence on her JCPP paper.

Authors; Susan H. Spence, Samantha J. Prosser, Sonja March, Caroline L. Donovan
First published:19 May 2020
doi.org/10.1111/jcpp.13257

Background

In general, Internet‐delivered cognitive behavior therapy (iCBT) produces significant reductions in child and adolescent anxiety, but a proportion of participants continue to show clinical levels of anxiety after treatment. It is important to identify demographic, clinical, and family factors that predict who is most likely to benefit from iCBT in order to better tailor treatment to individual needs.

Professor Sue Spence
Professor Sue Spence

Professor Emeritus Spence has a BSc (Hons – 1st class) and a PhD in Clinical Psychology. She is currently based in the Australian Institute of Suicide Research and Prevention, and the School of Applied Psychology at Griffith University and also holds the position of Honorary Professor at the University of Queensland. Her research focusses on the etiology, assessment, treatment and prevention of anxiety and depression in young people. She has received over $10.5 million in research grants during her career and has managed numerous randomised controlled trials to successful completion. She is the author of 8 books, 37 book chapters and over 130 research articles in refereed journals. Her research is highly influential, with over 13,000 citations, with publications in top international journals in her field. She places strong emphasis on translation of her research into clinical practice, being the author of the internationally used Spence Children’s Anxiety Scale and one of the founders of the BraveOnline treatment program. Professor Spence is a member of several editorial boards and is regularly invited to present keynote addresses at international conferences. Her work has been recognised through the awards of Officer of the Order of Australia, Fellowship of the Australian Psychological Society, British Psychological Society; the Academy of the Social Sciences of Australia and the Academy of Cognitive Therapy. (bio via Griffith University)

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